Monthly Archives: May 2018


Blog: News Update – May 31, 2018

Dear Friend of CORCRC, CORCRC and Catholics for Choice co-hosted Religious Freedom, Religious Refusals: Patients’ Rights in Catholic Healthcare Facilities on Wednesday evening in Colorado Springs.  Kathryn Joseph, J.D. State Policy Associate, Domestic Program, Dr. Joyce Lisbin, CORCRC Executive Director, and Dr. Maryam Guiahi, CORCRC Board Member, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado, Denver School of Medicine spoke about patient rights and the need for transparency in Catholic Administered hospitals.  The discussion focused on the limited reproductive health services that result from abiding by the Ethical Religious Directives (ERDs) written by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops.  These restrictions directly impact access to reproductive services, end-of-life care, and how LGBTQI patients and their families are treated. The ERDs mandate that doctors provide medical care that abides by the ethics of the Catholic...


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Blog: News Update – May 24, 2018

Dear Friend of CORCRC, The GAG Rule is Coming Home! We protested the negative impact of the Global Gag Rule that was signed by President Trump 48 hours after the Women’s March.  First signed by Reagan in 1984, this bill (also known as the Mexico City Policy) has been enforced by Republican presidents since then.  It states “non U.S. nongovernmental organizations receiving U.S. family planning funding cannot inform the public or educate their government on the need to make safe abortion available, provide legal abortion services, or provide advice on where to get an abortion.” The Rule blocks a doctor’s speech and obligation to share medical information so that a patient can make an informed medical decision.  The impact of this regulation has been disastrous for women’s health and has not reduced abortion....


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Blog: News Update – May 17, 2018

Dear Friend of CORCRC, CORCRC is strengthening its visibility and voice in preserving and expanding reproductive rights and religious freedom for all.  Many people are still surprised when they are introduced to a faith-based group that is FOR reproductive rights.  We could think of no better way to make our existence and mission better known than with a video. Our first video tells the CORCRC story from the point of view of four faith leaders: Rev. Stephan Papa, Rev. Valerie Jackson, Rabbi Birdie Becker and Sister Maryann Cunningham.  Each person describes their religious and personal framework that compels them to commit to a woman’s right to choose. The video is posted on the CORCRC website and proudly reaffirms PEOPLE OF FAITH TRUST WOMEN! Legislation Update Unfinished business: The 2018 state legislative session is...


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Blog: News Update – May 10, 2018

Dear Friend of CORCRC, The 2018 Faith and Freedom Award Reception was a very special evening! CORCRC honored two incredible reproductive rights champions: Karen Middleton, the Executive, NARAL Pro-Choice Colorado and Warren M. Hern, M.D.,M.P.H., Ph.D., Director Boulder Abortion Clinic.  Each of these leaders have tirelessly defended and strengthened reproductive rights and reproductive health care in Colorado. Karen inspired us by emphasizing the importance of connection and embracing the diverse members of the community that support reproductive rights.  These sentiments are converted to action in her work and as a lead member of the Colorado Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Coalition.  Dr. Hern’s commitment to his life’s work as an abortion provider was framed in a rare mixture of humor and historical references. His inspirational and exceptional speech is posted on our...


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Blog: News Update – May 3, 2018

Dear Friend of CORCRC, The phenomenon of the #MeToo movement is not as new as one might imagine.  Tarana Burke founded the Me Too movement in 2006. Yes, just like the problem of sexual harassment, the phrase Me Too has been around before the likes of Harvey Weinstein or Bill Cosby.  Women have been standing up for themselves and each other long before social media or celebrities made headlines. In 1997, Tarana Burke was working at a youth camp in Alabama when she was approached by a young girl who shared with her that ‘her mother’s boyfriend was ‘doing things to her”.  At the time, Burke was quiet, though she too had been assaulted as a child.  She wished that she had said ‘me too’. That lack of response motivated Burke to...


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